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Data Dashboard: Energy (archive)

Carbon Brief has compiled key indicators on the world’s emissions, energy and electricity. Use the links below to navigate our series of charts. We have a separate climate dashboard.


1a

Global energy-related CO2 emissions (billions of tonnes of CO2, blue bars) and annual GDP growth (% change, orange line). Shaded blue bars denote years where emissions grew by 1% or less. Sources: World GDP at constant prices, % change (International Monetary Fund World Economic Outlook, published 4/2015). Energy-related CO2 emissions (BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2015). Last updated: 12/10/2015

 

1b

Major economies’ energy-related CO2 emissions (billions of tonnes of CO2). Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2015Last updated: 12/10/2015

 

1c

Major economies’ per-capita energy-related CO2 emissions (tonnes of CO2 per capita). Sources: CO2 emissions (BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2015); populations (World Bankdata runs to 2014)Last updated: 12/10/2015

 

2a

Global primary energy use by source (billions of tonnes of oil equivalent). Other RE includes wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, wave and tidal electricity. Totals for hydro, nuclear and renewables are converted to tonnes of oil equivalent by calculating the amount of fossil fuels that would be needed to generate an equivalent amount of electricity (partial substitution method). Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2015Last updated: 12/10/2015

 

2b

Major economies’ coal use (billions of tonnes of oil equivalent). Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2015Last updated: 12/10/2015

 

2c

Major economies’ renewable energy use (billions of tonnes of oil equivalent). Includes hydro, wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, wave and tidal electricity. Totals are converted to tonnes of oil equivalent by calculating the amount of fossil fuels that would be needed to generate an equivalent amount of electricity (partial substitution method). Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2015Last updated: 12/10/2015

 

3a

Global electricity generation by source (thousands of terawatt hours). Other RE includes wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, wave and tidal electricity. Sources: Total generation (BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2015); shares of generation (World Bank World Development Indicatorsdata runs to 2012)Last updated: 12/10/2015

 

3b

Shares of electricity generation (%): World average and in major economies. Other RE includes wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, wave and tidal electricity. Source:World Bank World Development Indicators (data runs to 2012)Last updated: 12/10/2015

 

3c

Daily per capita electricity use by source (kilowatt hours per capita): World average and in major economies. Other RE includes wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, wave and tidal electricity. Sources: Total generation (BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2015); shares of generation (World Bank World Development Indicators, data runs to 2012); populations (World Bank, data runs to 2014)Last updated: 12/10/2015

 

4a

Major economies’ hydro power generation (thousands of terawatt hours). Note the scale is consistent across the charts for hydro, wind and solar generation. Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2015Last updated: 12/10/2015

 

4b

Major economies’ wind power generation (thousands of terawatt hours). Note the scale is consistent across the charts for hydro, wind and solar generation. Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2015Last updated: 12/10/2015

 

4c

Major economies’ solar power generation (thousands of terawatt hours). Note the scale is consistent across the charts for hydro, wind and solar generation. Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2015Last updated: 12/10/2015

 

5a

UK primary energy use by source (millions of tonnes of oil equivalent). Other RE includes wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, wave and tidal electricity. Totals for hydro, nuclear and renewables are converted to tonnes of oil equivalent by calculating the amount of fossil fuels that would be needed to generate an equivalent amount of electricity (partial substitution method). Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2015Last updated: 12/10/2015

 

5b

UK electricity generation by source (terawatt hours). Coal includes coke. Hydro excludes pumped hydro. Other RE includes wind, solar, biomass and bio-waste. Sources: Department for Energy and Climate Change energy trends table 5.1 (updated 9/2015) and  historical electricity data (updated 7/2015). Last updated: 12/10/2015

 

5c

UK greenhouse gas emissions by type and sector (millions of tonnes of CO2 equivalent). Source: Department for Energy and Climate Change provisional UK greenhouse gas emissions national statistics 2014 (published 3/2015).Last updated: 12/10/2015

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