Climate science

How we can make good decisions about geoengineering

  • 30 Sep 2014, 15:15
  • Dr Rob Bellamy

Next month's synthesis report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is due to give the organisation's verdict on geoengineering, a radical set of proposals to use large-scale technologies to tackle climate change.

There are two types of geoengineering. Carbon geoengineering seeks to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, for example by capturing it from the air and storing it underground, or by adding iron to the oceans to trigger carbon-absorbing algal blooms.

Solar geoengineering is different. It seeks to reflect some sunlight away from the Earth before it can be trapped by greenhouse gases.This can be done, for example, by spraying clouds with sea salt to make them more reflective, or by stratospheric aerosol injection, where reflective particles are pumped into the atmosphere.

Geoengineering

My colleagues and I have been  examining the importance of 'opening up' discussion about geoengineering to alternative options, different perspectives and real world complexity.

'Closing down' assessment

Our earlier research has shown that the ways in which researchers frame assessments of geoengineering have important effects on the conclusions people come to.

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Get ready for hotter summers and more flooding in the UK, say scientists

  • 29 Sep 2014, 16:10
  • Roz Pidcock

Weather-wise, the UK saw it all last year. The coldest spring for 50 years, a sweltering summer heat wave and the wettest winter since records began. Today, a new report examines whether climate change is upping the odds of these events occurring.

The collection of papers, published in a  bumper edition of journal Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, looks at 16 weather events that took place last year across the world. From Colorado to Korea, the scientists examine heatwaves, droughts, heavy rain and storms.

Human fingerprints

Globally, there is  evidence for changes in some types of extreme weather, and evidence for a human fingerprint in those changes. But different types of event are affected differently.

Climate change is greatly increasing the odds of heatwaves worldwide, today's report concludes. For storms, rainfall and drought the picture is less clear, however. Big differences between regions, natural variability in the climate and limited data make detecting changes over time far more difficult.

The science of disentangling human and natural influences on our climate is known as attribution. Dr Peter Stott, head of the climate change detection and attribution team at the Met Office and an editor on the report, explained more in a recent  guest blog  for us:

"[The aim is] to compare what actually happened with what might have happened in a world without anthropogenic climate change."

Understanding how our activities are changing the risk of some types of extremes is important for making decisions about how we can prepare for the future.

Hot summers

In summer 2013, western Europe experienced an extreme heatwave. Average temperatures for the June to August period sit just below those of 2003 - the hottest summer in Europe for at least  500 years.

At the same time, the UK experienced its hottest day since 2006 with temperatures of 33.5 degrees Celsius recorded at Heathrow airport, the report notes.

UKheatwave 2014

Sun-seekers flock to Margate in July 2013. Source:   UK heatwave via Shutterstock

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California is in drought, but is climate change to blame?

  • 29 Sep 2014, 15:43
  • Robert McSweeney

On the 17th January 2014, California's Governor declared a State of Emergency. The drought that had taken hold the year before was showing no signs of abating, with rivers and reservoirs at record lows.

As the situation worsened through 2014, one question was asked again and again - to what extent was human-caused climate change playing a role? A new report out today says the evidence is inconclusive, although it says there are still questions to be explored.

'Ridiculously Resilient Ridge'

Over 95 per cent of California is currently experiencing at least 'severe' drought (shown in orange in the map below), with almost 60 per cent in 'exceptional' drought (deep red).

 

 

 

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