New research

Why isn’t the Arctic sea ice free already?

  • 23 Sep 2014, 13:30
  • Roz Pidcock

Diminishing Arctic sea ice is perhaps the most iconic impact of climate change. There's a good chance that before too long we'll lose it altogether in summer unless we cut emissions, scientists say.

But according to polar scientist Dr Dirk Notz, the question isn't why is Arctic sea ice melting so fast, it's how come we have any left at all?

Notz told a Royal Society conference in London this morning that with the additional heat earth is absorbing Arctic sea ice "should be long gone by now".

So why isn't it?

Arctic decline

Arctic sea ice cover is declining by about  four per cent per decade. The seasonal low at the height of summer is shrinking particularly quickly, at more like 11.5 per cent per decade.

                      Arctic Sea Ice Low _Sep 17

The National Snow and Ice Data Centre announced this year's Arctic sea ice minimum on the 17th September. At 5.02 million square kilometers, it was the 6th lowest on record. Orange line is 1981 to 2010 average extent for that day. Source:  NSIDC

 

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How TV news covered the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s three big reports

  • 23 Sep 2014, 00:01
  • Mat Hope

TV audiences around the world aren't hearing much about climate science.

That's the main conclusion of a new study looking at how TV news covered the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) three big reports earlier this year.

While the IPCC's reports made a  small splash in the print media, the same wasn't true of television news. Media in many countries barely covered the reports. And when they did, they used an old-fashioned "doom" narrative to explain them, research by Oxford University's Reuters Institute finds.

That's concerning, because many people still get their news from the TV, and place particular trust in TV news to deliver a balanced account of climate science.

Here's which channels covered the reports, how, and why it matters.

Country divergence

The IPCC's first report on the science behind climate change was launched in October 2013. A second report on the impacts of climate change was released the final day of March 2014, with a  third report looking at policies to cut emissions following a couple of weeks later.

The Reuters Institute looked at how a selection of news bulletins in the UK, China, India, Brazil, Australia and Germany covered all three reports on their launch day, and the day before.

13 out of the 36 main news bulletins the Reuters Institute studied covered the IPCC reports. That adds-up to about 34 minutes of airtime.

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How climate-ready is your house?

  • 18 Sep 2014, 17:22
  • Robert McSweeney

Are you pulling out all the stops to climate-proof your home? Have you installed ceiling fans, planted trees for shade and taken out flood insurance? It's unlikely you have, according to a new study of household actions in the UK.

While we make simple actions to deal with a cold snap or heatwave, the research finds, households are struggling to prepare for long-term changes in climate.

What action can you take?

As global leaders prepare to convene in New York to discuss how to curb greenhouse gas emissions, a new paper discusses another side to limiting climate change - adaptation.

Adaptation means taking steps to increase our resilience against climate change that our past emissions have already committed us to, impacts that are now unavoidable.

The study, published in the journal Climatic Change, looks at adaptation measures people can take in their own homes. And the good news, is some actions are easy.  You've probably done many without realising. Putting on an extra jumper in a cold spell or eschewing the Sunday roast in favour of a salad during a heatwave are both adaptive responses.

Some actions aren't as simple as changing your diet or dipping into your wardrobe, however.

The study looks reviews published research on climate adaptation in UK households and finds that while we're pretty good at doing the easy things, we're not so great at making plans for the long-term.

A checklist

The paper runs through some adaptation options available to UK households, which we've illustrated in a checklist below. The list on the left are examples of actions for managing current risks, while the list on the right shows how to climate-proof for the longer-term.

 

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