10 of the best YouTube videos on climate change

  • 23 Apr 2015, 16:20
  • Sophie Yeo

YouTube turns 10 today. To celebrate, Carbon Brief has compiled a list of 10 of some of the best videos about climate change featured on the site. Featuring comedians, scientists and some very slick graphics, these hits have helped make the internet a more entertaining and informative place to learn about climate science and policy.

So, here they are (in no particular order):

1. A statistically representative climate debate

In US show Last Week Tonight, comedian John Oliver takes the media to task for creating a false balance in the debate on climate change. To more accurately represent the scientific consensus, he invites 97 scientists and three sceptics into the studio, to comedic effect. The video has gone viral, racking up over five million hits on YouTube to date.


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Scientists set out eight essential elements for UN climate deal

  • 22 Apr 2015, 07:25
  • Sophie Yeo

Seventeen high-profile scientists have set out eight demands for the UN negotiations on climate change in Paris at the end of this year.

These "essential elements" must be part of the UN's new agreement to ensure a climatically safe future where global temperatures are limited to below 2C and irreversible planetary changes are avoided, says the statement, compiled by the Earth League of scientists.

Released to coincide with Earth Day, the intervention is backed by scientists from across the globe, including Ottmar Edenhofer and Youba Sokona, who co-chaired the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report into the options for avoiding dangerous climate change.

Several of the elements are more ambitious than the pathways outlined by the IPCC, however, and go beyond the level of ambition currently on the table for Paris.

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Arctic sea ice hits lowest winter peak on record

  • 20 Mar 2015, 12:15
  • Robert McSweeney and Sophie Yeo

The latest satellite data shows the winter maximum extent of Arctic sea ice this year is the lowest recorded since measurements began in 1979. Provisional data from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) in the US shows 2015 has broken the previous record set in 2011 by 130,000 square kilometers.

Warm air temperatures in the Arctic have been a key reason why less ice has formed this winter, the NSIDC says.

It's around this time of year when the freeze-up of Arctic sea ice through the winter hits a peak, and signals the start of the melt season in spring and summer.

Using satellites, scientists can mark this point every year, recording when the Arctic sea ice hit its largest extent and the size it reached.

For 2015, the NSIDC thinks this point was on 25 February, when sea ice covered 14.54 million sq km. At 1.1 million sq km smaller than the 1981-2010 average, this year has set a new record for the lowest winter peak.

Arctic Sea Ice Winter Extent _NSIDC

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