Media round-up: The IPCC synthesis report

  • 04 Nov 2014, 16:54
  • Robert McSweeney & Rosamund Pearce

On Sunday the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published its synthesis report, which summarises the findings of three huge assessment reports. It prompted a flurry of media coverage. Here are some selected highlights.

Broadcast media

  • BBC News discusses the "controversial" recommendation that fossil fuels should be phased out by the end of the century - "a huge undertaking". Since every attempt to negotiate a new climate treaty has failed, and with Paris on the horizon, the BBC asks: "has anything really changed?"

  • With the "glacial" pace of the UN negotiating process,  Channel 4 news asks: can we adapt fast enough? Professor Joanna Haigh argues that climate change has not dropped of the agenda, discusses geoengineering versus preventative measures, and the value of the political process.

channel4news.png

  • In The IPCC report: why it matters, the BBC debates why another report was needed right now. Scientists believe that political leaders are in the process to agree a new climate deal - and they want to give them the most succinct report for this - "It may be the runt of the litter in size, but in political terms, it could turn out to be a real heavyweight".

  • In Climate change action will cost, the BBC broadcasts Ban Ki-moon's speech at the launch of the report.

more

The IPCC’s untapped resource: the frequently asked questions

  • 03 Nov 2014, 09:41
  • Robert McSweeney

This Sunday, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will publish its latest Synthesis Report, a non-technical summary of three huge Assessments Reports.

But there is another easily-accessible IPCC resource that has already been published and is often overlooked: the IPCC's Frequently Asked Questions.

So what information does an FAQ written by the world's top climate scientists provide?

Here are some of the questions they cover:

- FAQ 1.1: If understanding of the climate system has increased, why hasn't the range of temperature projections been reduced?

- FAQ 2.1: How do we know the world has warmed?

- FAQ 2.2: Have there been any changes in climate extremes?

- FAQ 3.1: Is the ocean warming?

- FAQ 3.2: Is there evidence for changes in the Earth's water cycle? 

- FAQ 3.3: How does anthropogenic ocean acidification relate to climate change?

- FAQ 4.1: How is sea-ice changing in the Arctic and Antarctic? 

- FAQ 4.2: Are glaciers in mountain regions disappearing?

- FAQ 5.1: Is the Sun a major driver of recent changes in climate? 

- FAQ 5.2: How unusual is the current sea level rate of change?

- FAQ 6.1: Could rapid release of methane and carbon dioxide from thawing permafrost or ocean warming substantially increase warming? 

- FAQ 6.2: What happens to carbon dioxide after it is emitted into the atmosphere? 

- FAQ 7.1: How do clouds affect climate and climate change?

- FAQ 7.2: How do aerosols affect climate and climate change?

- FAQ 7.3: Could geoengineering counteract climate change and what side effects might occur?

- FAQ 8.1: How important Is water vapour to climate change?

- FAQ 8.2: Do improvements in air quality have an effect on climate change?

- FAQ 9.1: Are climate models getting better, and how would we know? 

- FAQ 10.1: Climate is always changing. How do we determine the causes of observed changes?

- FAQ 10.2: When will human influences on climate become obvious on local scales?- FAQ 11.1: If you cannot predict the weather next month, how can you predict climate for the coming decade?

- FAQ 11.2: How do volcanic eruptions affect climate and our ability to predict climate?

- FAQ 12.1: Why are so many models and scenarios used to project climate change?

- FAQ 12.2: How will the Earth's water cycle change? 

- FAQ 12.3: What would happen to future climate if we stopped emissions today? 

- FAQ 13.1: Why does local sea level change differ from the global average? 

- FAQ 13.2: Will the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets contribute to sea level change over the rest of the century?

- FAQ 14.1: How is climate change affecting monsoons?

- FAQ 14.2: How are future projections in regional climate related to projections of global means?

more

Probing the deep: An in-depth look at the oceans, climate change and the hiatus

  • 20 Oct 2014, 08:40
  • Roz Pidcock and Rosamund Pearce

Oceans cover more of the planet than anything else. So it makes sense that we need to know what's happening to them to understand how humans are changing the climate. 

If you follow climate science, you'd be forgiven for being a little confused recently by different news reports suggesting the oceans are warming, slightly  cooling or doing  nothing at all.

So are the oceans hotting up or aren't they? And how does what happens beneath the waves influence what we feel up here on earth's surface? Here's our top to bottom look at the oceans and climate change.

More heat in, less heat out

Scientists have known for centuries that greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, such as carbon dioxide and methane, trap heat and warm the planet. This is known as the greenhouse effect.

Scientists use satellite measurements to monitor how much of the sun's energy enters earth's atmosphere. A different set of measurements tells them how much finds its way out again.

The difference between those numbers is increasing, which means the earth is  trapping more heat than it used to. And that means the planet  must be warming.

A hiatus in surface warming

An interesting question is why temperatures at earth's surface - that's the air above land and the very top of the ocean - don't always reflect what's happening to the planet as a whole.

Over the last 15 years or so, surface temperatures have risen  much slower than in previous decades, even though we're emitting greenhouse gases  faster than we were before.

This is what's become known as the "hiatus", "slowdown" or even "pause" in surface warming.

This raises an obvious question. If earth is  gaining heat but the surface isn't warming very much, where is the heat going instead?

Where does the heat go?

Oceanheatadjustedocean 2nologo

more